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Special Needs

At Mandelbaum Barrett, our compassionate and experienced attorneys provide a wide variety of legal services intended to help your family navigate the legal system and maximize the rights and benefits available to individuals with special needs.

If you have a loved one with a special need, you know how important it is to protect their rights and plan for their future.  At Mandelbaum Barrett, our compassionate and experienced attorneys provide a wide variety of legal services intended to help your family navigate the legal system and maximize the rights and benefits available to individuals with special needs.

Our Special Needs Department offers a full range of legal services for individuals with special needs and their families, including:

  • Special Education & Student Discipline
  • Special Needs Trusts
  • Estate Planning
  • Guardianships
  • Disability Benefits
  • Elder Law

We protect the legal and civil rights of students with disabilities.  Your special needs child is legally entitled to a free appropriate public education (FAPE) with individually tailored services and accommodations to meaningfully benefit from his or her educational program in the least restrictive environment (LRE). But what happens when your special needs child is not progressing in his or her program or needs more class support? What happens when the school district decides to take services away from your child? What happens when the school is not following your child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP)? What happens when your special needs child is disciplined for conduct related to his or her disability? The school district may make decisions that you do not agree with and you may not know what your legal rights are and what resources available to you and your child.  If that’s the case, you need help from a special education attorney.  Let us help.  Contact us for a consultation.

Our services include:

  • Reviewing educational records, including evaluations, IEPs, and Section 504 plans.
  • Consultation and advice about identification and classification, procedural safe guards, program and placement options, compensatory education, extended school year, related services, and independent evaluations.
  • Attending IEP meetings.
  • Advocacy at mediations and due process hearings.
  • Planning strategy, settlement negotiations, judicial enforcement of settlements and orders, and obtaining attorneys’ fees awards following due process hearings.
  • Consultation regarding student discipline procedures pertaining to disabled students.

Special needs trusts are frequently created by a parent or another family member for a child with special needs even though the child may be an adult by the time the trust is created or funded. Our attorneys draft these trust documents so that the money being provided to the disabled child (the “beneficiary”) won’t be considered as belonging to the beneficiary when the government determines benefit eligibility. Through a special needs trust, a disabled beneficiary can receive gifts, lawsuit settlements and other funds without being denied eligibility for many income-dependent government programs. A properly designed and administered Special Needs Trust will serve to supplement public benefits such as SSI and Medicaid without jeopardizing eligibility. Such trusts can also be set up in a will as a way for someone to leave assets to a disabled relative. We will help you design a plan to protect such public benefits of your disabled child as well as allow you to protect them for their lifetime.

Our attorneys are happy to discuss the process for setting up a special needs trust for your child that benefits them now and in the future. Contact us if we can help you with this important estate planning tool.

Predicting the future is impossible, but planning the future of a loved one with a disability is a necessity.  From guardianship, to special needs trust, to special needs estate planning – the law is complicated. At Mandelbaum Barrett, our attorneys can help you and your family plan for the future. Let us help you develop a life plan so you have peace of mind. We will take into account your family’s legal, financial, medical, social and family issues when developing a plan.  Contact us today to set up a consultation.  We are here to help you.

Now is the time to start planning for your loved ones with disabilities. The sooner you make a plan, the better off you and your loved one will be.  When preparing a will, careful planning is essential to ensure that family members are protected, that assets are not needlessly depleted, and that tax exposure is minimized. Consideration must be given to ensuring eligibility, both now and in the future, for services and benefits.

Our services include:

  • Providing your family with estate planning strategies taking into account your family’s particular legal, financial, medical, social and family issues.
  • Working with you to develop a life plan so that primary caregivers will have peace of mind that your loved one with disabilities will be cared for properly when you’re no longer able to do so.
  • Developing estate plans that protect your loved one’s access to government benefits and medical programs.

Mandelbaum Barrett represents clients seeking to establish a guardianship for an incapacitated parent or developmentally disabled adult. As your family member approaches his or her 18th birthday, you should consider taking action that will legally appoint you as his or her guardian. By doing this, you’ll be able to act on his or her behalf when making important decisions regarding education, medical treatment, and financial matters. Guardianship will help you look out for your family members’ best interests and protect him or her from harm. Our attorneys can advise you on how the guardianship application process work and what information you will need.

Government statistics show that you are much more likely to be awarded Social Security disability benefits when you have an attorney to help you. Mandelbaum Barrett assists clients seeking a wide range of disability benefits. Those who have not worked the requisite time period to qualify may still be eligible for supplemental security income (SSI), a benefit that may be available to disabled children as well as adults. Additionally, we assist clients with private disability insurance claims that are subject to strict scrutiny and evaluation by insurers and third party administrators.

Elder law is a specialized field of law that focuses on the needs of the elderly, the disabled, and their families. Using a holistic approach, our elder law attorneys address a wide range of issues that focus on the needs of the growing aging population. We appreciate the complex financial and social decisions clients face in navigating the maze of government benefit programs, long-term care options, and assisting loved ones with diminished capacity. As an added benefit to better serve our clients, the Chair of our Elder Law Department, Richard I. Miller, is a Certified Elder Law Attorney, Certified by the National Elder Law Foundation, an accredited organization of the American Bar Association.

Arla Cahill, Esq. and Brent Pohlman, Esq. to present at the ACCSES NJ STAR Conference

September 12, 2022

Mandelbaum Barrett Special Needs Partner Arla D. Cahill, Esq. and Employment Law Partner Brent Pohlman, Esq. will be presenting at the upcoming ACCSES New Jersey Star Conference on September 21st, 2022. They will be giving a “Disability Law Primer” as an introduction to relevant state and federal laws pertinent to service providers of individuals with disabilities, including the Americans […]

Richard Miller, Esq. and Shawna Kirchner Brown, Esq. will join a panel of distinguished judges and legal professionals for a NJICLE seminar

August 30, 2022

Mandelbaum Barrett Elder Law Chair Richard Miller, Esq. and Associate Shawna Kirchner Brown, Esq. will join a panel of distinguished judges and legal professionals for a New Jersey Institute for Continuing Legal Education on September 29th at the New Jersey Law Center in New Brunswick. “Guardians Ad Litem – How They Work and How to Get Appointed” will take a look […]

Congratulations to Donald “Donny” A. Dennison, Esq., who has been elected to serve on the Executive Committee for the New Jersey State Bar Association, Elder and Disability Law Section for 2022-2023.

June 24, 2022

Donny will be serving as the Legislative Chair and his responsibilities will include presenting new state and federal legislation to the Section for review, facilitating discussions within the Section about the applicable pieces of legislation, and presenting the Section’s position to the State Bar Association if the Section decides as a whole to support / […]

Arla Cahill Featured In Special Education Webinar Presented By Family Partners of Morris and Sussex Counties

June 23, 2020

Arla Cahill Interviewed on Jersey Matters to Talk about Legal Remedies for School Bullying

November 25, 2019

Parents have legal remedies against bullying in schools on behalf of their children. Hear what Mandelbaum Barrett's Education Law Chair Arla Cahill has to say about New Jersey's Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights Act on a recent episode of Jersey Matters with Larry Mendte.

Arla D. Cahill Appointed to the Executive Committee of Employment Horizons, Inc

June 3, 2019

Congratulations to Arla D. Cahill, Co-Chair of the Firm's Special Needs Practice, who was appointed to the Executive Committee of Employment Horizons, Inc. Employment Horizons was founded in Morristown in 1957 by a group of forward-thinking parents who wanted to expand work and personal growth opportunities for their children with disabilities. Over the years, Employment Horizons has implemented innovative programs to meet the needs and choices of those they serve, both on-site as well as in the community. They provide job training and placement services to people with disabilities and other barriers to employment in the greater Morris County, NJ area. Arla has been active in the organization for a number of years and we know she will continue to do great things.

Mandelbaum Barrett's March 2019 Special Needs Newsletter

March 21, 2019

Mandelbaum Barrett's March Special Needs Newsletter is now available. In this issue you can read about what a special needs trust can pay for and kiddie tax changes. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Practice Group Co-Chair's Richard Miller or Arla D. Cahill. Click here to read this month's issue.

Shawna Brown to Speak at Progressive Comprehensive Services, LLC on Special Needs Trusts Funds, Guardianship and More

March 14, 2019

Shawna Brown, an Associate at Mandelbaum Barrett will be speaking at a special interactive family event hosted by Progressive Comprehensive Services, LLC on the ABLE-ACT, Special Needs Trusts Funds and Guardianship. To learn more about this event or to register, click here.

Mandelbaum Barrett's February 2019 Special Needs Newsletter

February 20, 2019

Mandelbaum Barrett's February Special Needs Newsletter is now available. In this issue you can read about ABLE accounts, a difficult question parents of adult children with disabilities face, and more. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact Practice Group Co-Chair's Richard Miller or Arla D. Cahill. Read more here.

November Special Needs Newsletter

November 7, 2018

Our November Special Needs newsletter is now available. This month you will learn about who can set up ABLE accounts, the rise of social security payments in 2019 and more. For any questions you have regarding these and other special needs issues, contact Co-Chair Richard Miller. Click here to read this month's issue.

Special Needs News — Winter 2017/2018 Issue

November 30, 2017

The Firm's Special Needs Practice Group has published its Winter 2017/2018 issue! Learn about Disabled Students' Rights under Anti-Bullying Laws, What is a Special Needs Trust, Considerations in Choosing a Special Needs Trust and more.

Spring 2017 Special Needs Newsletter

March 10, 2017

The Firm’s Special Needs Practice Group has issued its Spring 2017 Newsletter which highlights recent developments in the area of Special Needs Law such as recent Supreme Court decisions, a new child support termination law and its impact on the special needs child and adult,

Richard I. Miller Interviewed for U.S. News & World Report Article

February 15, 2017

Richard I. Miller, Co-Chair of the Firm’s Special Needs Practice and Member of the Elder Law Practice, was interviewed for a U.S. News & World Report article on tax tips for people with disabilities and their caregivers. The article ran on February 15, 2017. To read the

Richard I. Miller Authored Article For CPNJ Winter 2017 Newsletter

January 12, 2017

Richard I. Miller, Co-Chair of the Firm’s Special Needs Practice, authored an article for the Winter 2017 issue of "Independent" a newsletter of Cerebral Palsy of North Jersey (CPNJ). The article, entitled "Recent Developments in Planning for Individuals with Special Needs" can be found on

Most Who Apply for Social Security Disability Insurance Are Rejected; What Can You Do to Improve Your Chances?

September 26, 2022

Living with a disability is tough enough, but so is obtaining income support through Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) — especially without help from professionals who know how the system works. About 25 percent of people who are 20 years old today will experience a disability at some point in their lives, notes a recent article in Kiplinger. Meanwhile, the […]

Mainstream Vouchers Can Help People With Disabilities, and Their Families, Afford a Place to Live

September 13, 2022

Mainstream vouchers provide federally funded housing assistance to persons aged 18 to 61 with a disability, who are homeless, are living in an institution, or are at risk of homelessness or institutionalization. Mainstream vouchers are unique in that they can help any household that includes a qualifying person lease affordable private housing of their choice. How […]

Should You Consider A Guardianship or Conservatorship for Your Loved One With Special Needs?

August 22, 2022

Many relatives or caretakers of loved ones living with a disability may at some point need to be able to exert more control over their family member’s personal affairs. For parents of children who have a disability, for instance, that time is often when the child is turning 18. However, you may face roadblocks if […]

The Powers and Responsibilities of Representative Payees

August 18, 2022

Do you have a friend or loved one who receives Social Security and is unable to manage her payments? If so, you can request that the Social Security Administration (SSA), the government agency that disburses Social Security, name you as the representative payee for that person. Being a representative payee gives you the power and […]

Housing Considerations When Your Child With Special Needs Becomes an Adult

August 8, 2022

Affordable, safe housing is one of the most crucial aspects of a person’s life, especially if that person has a disability. Parents and guardians must plan for this as early as possible to make sure their loved one has a secure and appropriate living situation long after they either become unable to provide care or […]

Through PASS, People With Disabilities Can Pursue Work Goals Without Losing SSI Benefits

July 12, 2022

To qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI), a federal program that provides people with disabilities a monthly stipend, individuals must conform to very strict income and asset limits. Often, SSI beneficiaries who could hold a job opt not to because they worry about losing their benefits if they earn too much. While this is a valid concern, a […]

What Can ABLE Account Money Be Spent On?

June 17, 2022

ABLE (Achieving a Better Life Experience) accounts offer people with disabilities a great, tax-free way to accumulate money without jeopardizing their qualifications for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and other means-tested programs. Withdrawals are tax-free as long as the money is used for “qualified disability expenses.”  The arguments for starting and maintaining such funds are overwhelming, not […]

Support Your Child With Disabilities — and Still Qualify for Medicaid

June 17, 2022

If you have a child with a disability, providing for them into the future will likely stand among your top priorities. However, if you also wish to apply for Medicaid to cover your own long-term care expenses, first consider establishing a special needs trust (SNT) for your child. This will allow you to transfer assets […]

Assistance Is Available for Veterans’ Children with Disabilities

June 17, 2022

Children with disabilities whose parents are veterans, living or deceased, may be entitled to government support. Veterans and their children might not be aware of the fact, but financial assistance is available through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Social Security Administration, whether for health care costs, vocational training, or in the form of survivor […]

SSA Reopens Its Offices While Making It Easier to Apply for SSI Online

May 6, 2022

The Social Security Administration (SSA) has reopened its more than 1,200 field offices to the public for the first time in two years, and the agency also launched an online tool for first-time Supplemental Security Income (SSI) applicants.

SSA closed its offices at the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic in March 2020, forcing the 43 million people who visit them each year to transact business via telephone, fax, and the mail. Many clients reported difficulties getting through to the agency, raising fears that services were being denied to the most vulnerable.

But the offices were back open April 7, albeit with restrictions: Masks and social distancing are still required. To avoid overcrowding, the agency is still urging people to make appointments — though these are not mandated — and to avoid coming in person altogether if they can accomplish what they need to online or by phone. Alternatively, officials are advising people to postpone in-person visits to avoid long lines that are expected during the first weeks of reopening.

When Is It OK for an SNT Trustee to Be Compensated?

April 13, 2022

Question: Should a special needs trust (SNT) trustee be paid, and, if so, how much?

Answer: It depends. The demands on a trustee can vary widely, depending on the size and complexity of the trust. Some family members serving in this role might simply oversee distributions and not need to charge anything at all for their time. But often the duties of a trustee can extend way beyond this scenario and warrant financial compensation — even for nonprofessional trustees who are family members. Such tasks can include making investment decisions about the trust's assets, arranging distributions to beneficiaries, paying taxes and other bills, and preparing an extensive annual report on the trust's income and outlays.

Advice on Vice: Do Alcohol, Tobacco and Pornography Count as Special Needs?

March 24, 2022

Vice might be nice, as the old saying goes, but can things like cigarettes, alcohol and pornography be paid for out of a special needs trust ("SNT")?

The answer is… it depends. Obviously, if such activities are specifically ruled out in a third-party trust, then no cigar. If, for example, the person who funded and established the trust (sometimes referred to as the Grantor or Settlor) stipulated in the trust's terms that it not be used to purchase alcohol or cigarettes, then it is the trustee's duty to enforce those prohibitions. In many ways, the trustee serves as a referee calling the shots with the regard to what can and cannot be purchased using trust assets. But many trusts do not address such activities, so what is a trustee to do when a beneficiary wants to light up, pour a drink, and settle down to a pornographic pay-per-view movie on the trust's dime?

The Earned Income Tax Credit ("EITC") Has Been Expanded, Now Covering More People with Disabilities

March 18, 2022

For the 2021 tax year, the IRS is expanding eligibility for the Earned Income Tax Credit ("EITC"), an important anti-poverty measure that assists those with low incomes either avoid paying taxes altogether, or in some cases, offering those individuals tax refunds that they would not have otherwise received. One key impact of these changes is that more people without children, many of whom are also people with disabilities will also qualify. Traditionally people with disabilities have left money on the table by assuming they would not qualify for the EITC.

Divorce and the Child With Special Needs: Be Aware of Child Support Payments

February 24, 2022

Depending on which statistics you believe, between 40 and 50 percent of first marriages will end in divorce or permanent separation, and second marriages fare even worse. While there is no such thing as a "typical" divorce, a divorcing couple that has a child with special needs faces an even more complicated series of decisions and choices than most. Family law attorneys, often well trained in the complicated and emotionally charged world of divorce settlement, may not have all of the answers for the divorcing parents of a child with special needs. In these cases, it is important to meet with a special needs planner to discuss options for your child. One important consideration is the impact child support payments will have on the child's eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

California Is the First State to Move Toward Removing the Asset Limit for Medicaid Eligibility

February 7, 2022

In a groundbreaking move that could have repercussions in certain other states, California is the first state to phase out the requirement that people impoverish themselves before becoming eligible for Medicaid.

Medicaid helps pay medical costs for individuals with limited income, and it covers long-term care for the elderly and people with disabilities who qualify for coverage. To be eligible for this coverage, you must meet the program's strict income and asset guidelines which vary from state to state. Also, unlike Medicare, which is totally federal, Medicaid is a joint state-federal program. Each state operates its own Medicaid system, but this system must conform to federal guidelines in order for the state to receive federal money, which pays for about half the state's Medicaid costs. (The state picks up the rest of the tab.)

SSA Encourages Those on Disability to Work — Until It Doesn't

February 1, 2022

The federal government says it encourages people receiving federal disability payments to find jobs—but sometimes ends up discouraging them from working at all, a study has found.

Recipients of Supplemental Security Income Now Have 50 Extra Days to Appeal Benefits Cuts

January 18, 2022

People facing a reduction, suspension, or other change to their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) now have more time to file an appeal, in a concession by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to delays and difficulties wrought by the COVID-19 crisis.

In 2022, Social Security Disability Recipients Will See the Biggest Increase in Four Decades

November 8, 2021

The year was 1983: The U.S. invaded Granada. A gallon of gas cost 96 cents. Michael Jackson's "Thriller" video premiered. That year was also the last time that recipients of Social Security disability benefits saw a cost-of-living increase steeper than the one just announced for 2022. This year, benefits will rise 5.9 percent, the sharpest upsurge since 1983's 7.4 percent jump.

"New and Improved" Tax Deductions for Parents of Children with Special Needs

November 3, 2021

Unique tax benefits are available to families who have children with special needs. And thanks to recent changes in the tax code, there are opportunities to save substantial amounts of money at tax time. Thomas M. Brinker, Jr., a professor of accounting at Arcadia University in Pennsylvania, has put together a handy checklist of some potential tax benefits that could be available to families who care for a special needs child.

Supreme Court to Hear Case That Could Increase the Bite That Medicaid Takes Out of Settlements

October 11, 2021

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case disputing how much states can recoup from Medicaid recipients' settlements in personal injury cases. The decision has the potential to affect anyone who receives government assistance with their medical care following a disabling injury that results in a lawsuit.

The Perils and Pitfalls of Do-It-Yourself Special Needs Planning

October 7, 2021

Among the costs of caring for a dependent with special needs are the fees for professional advice. Some families are tempted to save on these costs by setting up a plan on their own.

Pandemic Payments Now Won't Affect SSI Benefits or Eligibility at All

September 22, 2021

Pandemic-related financial assistance will no longer affect an individual's eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or the benefit amount, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has announced. The assistance includes a long list of pandemic payments, ranging from COVID-19 relief checks to state unemployment assistance.

Leaving an IRA to a Special Needs Trust Is No Longer Such a Bad Idea

September 16, 2021

The SECURE Act, passed at the end of 2019, changed a number of rules regarding inherited IRAs, making it more difficult for most beneficiaries to save on taxes by "stretching" distributions over many years. However, an exception to the new rules potentially changes advice that special needs planners often give clients.

Never Say Never: Navigating the Appeals Process if You've Been Denied Social Security Disability Benefits

September 7, 2021

The United States has two federal government benefits programs to help people with disabilities: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Fact or Fiction: I Know This Much Is True

May 3, 2021

HBO's I Know This Much Is True chronicles the lives of identical twins Dominick and Thomas Birdsey, both played by Mark Ruffalo.

Fact or Fiction: Reviewing 2021 Golden Globe Nominated Films about Elder Law and Special Needs Issues

March 12, 2021

March 12, 2021 By Richard I. Miller This year’s Golden Globe nominees included four films that directly relate to the issues handled by our elder law and special needs attorneys. In the coming weeks we will discuss each film, and analyze whether the facts, storylines and legal issues they present are realistic, or pure fiction. […]

What Can a Special Needs Trust Pay For?

February 16, 2021

February 16, 2021 By Richard I. Miller A special needs trust is designed to provide a person with a disability the funds to enhance her quality of life while at the same time allowing her to remain eligible for needs-based public benefits. Government programs like Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) provide essentials, such as […]

What's in a Name: Why the Title on Your Financial Accounts Matter

February 10, 2021

A name often defines who we are and sometimes, even, who we become. The same is true for the name on your financial accounts. One of the biggest myths and misconceptions of estate planning is that a Will controls the disposition of all assets at death. This is not the case and could lead to […]

A Primer On New Jersey's Court Rules for Guardianships

February 9, 2021

In New Jersey, a child is considered an emancipated person at age 18, irrespective of the severity of disability. As a result, parents of special needs children no longer have the legal right to make medical, legal, financial or personal decisions for children over age 18 even if the child is unable to do so him or herself. Parents often must be appointed guardian for their disabled child to acquire the legal authority to oversee and assist with the child's affairs.

Special Needs Trusts: One Size Does Not Fit All

November 2, 2020

By Richard I. Miller November 2020 Special Needs Trusts enable funds to be set aside for individuals with a disability without disqualifying a beneficiary from government benefits such as SSI and Medicaid. To qualify for SSI and Medicaid, an individual’s resources cannot exceed $2,000. A properly designed Special Needs Trust will supplement public benefits without […]

Finding the Right Fit: What Parents of Special Needs Students Should Know When Applying for College

October 6, 2019

For many students who are classified in the public school as having an educational disability under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the difference between the educational supports provided in high school and college or other post-secondary learning environments can be significant. A major difference is that, in high school, a classified student has a […]

What Legal Protections Do Children Have Against Bullying in School?

September 16, 2019

Many parents naturally assume that their child is safely in the care and supervision of their school’s teachers and administrators. While schools may try their best to protect students from various physical safety issues that could occur on school premises, it is more difficult for school personnel to protect students from bullying. Bullying not only […]

Back to School Alert: Students' Rights Under NJ's Anti-Bullying Law

August 29, 2019

Arla D. Cahill has authored a special Back to School Alert discussing student's rights under NJ's Anti-Bullying Law. Click here to read more.

Decision Making in Divorce Cases Involving Children With Special Needs

February 12, 2018

February 12, 2018 By Lynne Strober Making decisions with regard to educational and medical issues involving a special needs child can be challenging for parents under ordinary circumstances, but is further complicated when parents who are divorced or in the midst of a divorce action are unable to agree on such important issues. Most judgments […]

Five Considerations in Choosing a Special Needs Trustee

February 1, 2018

February 1, 2018 By Richard I. Miller Choosing the right person to serve as trustee of a special needs trust is one of the most important and difficult issues in creating the trust. A trustee typically manages the day-to-day operations of the trust, often making distributions to the trust’s beneficiary, investing the trust’s assets, and […]

Disabled Students' Rights under Anti-Bullying Laws

January 8, 2018

January 8, 2018 By Arla D. Cahill A 2009 study by the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education, “Indicators of School Crime and Safety,” reported that 32% of students aged 12 through 18 were bullied in the previous school year. The study reported that 25% of the responding public schools indicated that bullying was a […]

Court Decides What Level of Educational Benefit Schools Must Deliver to Educationally Disabled Students

April 6, 2017

April 6, 2017 By Arla D. Cahill and Brian M. Block On March 22, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its highly anticipated decision in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District. The case posed the following question: what is the level of educational benefit that school districts must confer on children with disabilities to […]

Disabled Students Can File ADA and Section 504 Discrimination Claims Without Administrative Exhaustion Under the IDEA

April 4, 2017

April 4, 2017 By Arla D. Cahill and Brian M. Block On February 22, 2017, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously in favor of a disabled student, Elena, and her family in Fry v. Napoleon Community Schools, by reversing and remanding the case back to the appellate court. Fry upheld a disabled student’s right to […]

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